Interdisciplinary Development of an Educational Game for Primary School Children – Lessons Learned

Posted by Felix Winkelnkemper on June 21 2020 at 6:12 p.m.


  • Question to the audience: Do you know good examples for digital learning tools, which are reconfigurable or reprogrammable, yet remain easy to use?

    Posted

  • Thanks for your paper. As I read through it I was thinking they should just implement a back and forward tool to allow the players to revert to previous states - which is what you were going to tell us. However in your conclusion you suggested that some stakeholders didn't understand the state idea, but I would suggest that they just didn't have the formal terminology.

    Almost anyone who has played with a few apps discovers the undo and redo features - which means they understand states intuitively. So maybe it is a language issue - where folks at different levels of understanding have difficulties communicating because they are not fully aware of constructs that are needed. To overcome this, and support learning, perhaps the folks in the more advanced level in any domain, ought to consider where others may be in their understanding, and use language that is more conducive to communication across levels. Perhaps examining the Van Hiele model in geometry might provide some insight. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Van_Hiele_model

    Posted

    • Thank you very much for your comment. We should get in contact about this! We did of course implement an undo-redo functionality. However, from our experience, there is a difference between understanding redo and undo and understanding the concept of state in general – which in this case means that s snapshot can be more than an image. You could save the state of the game, see it as an image, and could later revert to that state. This functionality might from an architecural point of view be similar to an undo-redo-function, but from the intentional perspective, quite a different technical function is realized.

      Posted in reply to Timothy Pelton

  • I am a math educator, but I also have a background in CSc. We have developed several simple apps for elementary level students - using our combined understanding of CSc and Ed. Our key principles for games are: 1. include a meaningful model so that students can figure out an answer without guessing/grinding; 2. Keep it simple; 3. Focus on sense-making and accuracy first - sense making is much more important than fluency generally. Then in suggestions to parents/tutors/teachers, we encourage them to ask the students to explain: what are they doing? what happened? what are their strategies? how would they help another student? what other approach might you try. etc. so that students shift away from mindless performing and toward sense-making.

    Posted

    • Interesting. All the questions you mentioned here focus on the functional aspects of the app. Do you also investigate the technological understanding of the app or would you consider that to be unimportant or even harmful in this situation?

      Posted in reply to Timothy Pelton

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